Thoughts of a Kohled Nomad

NPR just released yet another short collection of noteworthy international tunes - including, but not limited to, a piece by the up-and-coming Egyptian band Cairokee entitled “Ghareeb Fe Belad Ghareeba”, featuring Egyptian shaabi singer Abd El Basset Hamouda. A mostly underground band, Cairokee rose to fame during the initial 2011 uprising in Egypt. They now craft songs that are pertinent to current events, and with this tune, they attest to feeling like a “stranger in a strange land”. 

Aaaand, we’re back! NPR just released its Top 10 of its World Music repertoire for 2013. Check it out, especially the album of tracks recorded in Yemen in the 1960s and 1970s. 

Several weeks after reading G. Willow Wilson’s “Cairo” graphic novel, and I’m discovering an affection for this type of literature, particularly if it pertains to the Arab World. This one touches upon a not-so-pleasant subject that is particularly prevalent in Egypt these days, one that affects women regardless of creed or race. 

The season of harvest begins: end-of-summer tomatoes at a local farm stand tempt passers-by in Vienna, Virginia, USA

The season of harvest begins: end-of-summer tomatoes at a local farm stand tempt passers-by in Vienna, Virginia, USA

"Le Temps de Voir" by Saurez ft. Léonie - one of those beloved fusion songs I can’t get enough of, the current chanson du jour. Suarez is a Belgium-based band consisting of Italian-French and Madagascarian musicians and singers; in this song, which is French for "The Time to See", they feature Léonie, a young lady who recently won the Belgian version of "The Voice". Catchy and apt to get stuck in your head, this song asks: can you lend me your history? Which begs the question - is it possible for anyone to truly walk in someone else’s shoes? 

An absolutely incredible collection of hand-colored lantern slides from 1910. Most of Cairo still looks the same; only the attire seems to have changed.

"Desfado" by modern-day Fado singer Ana Moura. Reminiscent of the voice of the enchanting and legendary fadista Amelia Rodrigues, one cannot help but tap their feet to this upbeat tune.

A date vendor stands in his his stall at the edge of the Casabah in Algiers, waiting for his last customers of the day after making a very large sale of the highly sought after “diglat noor" variety. This particular type of date is named so because it said that they are transparent through the light. Algiers, Algeria, May 2013
To those who celebrate, happy Ramadan, and may it rejuvenate your souls, just as the gentle date rejuvenates the body after a long day’s fast.

A date vendor stands in his his stall at the edge of the Casabah in Algiers, waiting for his last customers of the day after making a very large sale of the highly sought after “diglat noor" variety. This particular type of date is named so because it said that they are transparent through the light. Algiers, Algeria, May 2013

To those who celebrate, happy Ramadan, and may it rejuvenate your souls, just as the gentle date rejuvenates the body after a long day’s fast.

A little photo essay I had the privilege of being a part of. BostonStrong!

Today marks the passing of one of India’s most celebrated musicians, Mr. Ravi Shankar, sitar player extraordinaire and father of two phenomenal female musicians, Norah Jones and Anoushka Shankar. This tune, “Svara Mantra”, was introduced to me many moons ago and is my favourite of his, although his repertoire of music is extensive. Farewell to another talented member of humanity.

"You can crush the flowers, but you can’t delay spring." A stencil created by Bahia Shehab, an Egyptian artist, who spray paints her images all over Cairo. This quote is one from the great Pablo Neruda, translated into Arabic.

"You can crush the flowers, but you can’t delay spring." A stencil created by Bahia Shehab, an Egyptian artist, who spray paints her images all over Cairo. This quote is one from the great Pablo Neruda, translated into Arabic.

The people of this world are like three butterflies in front of a candle’s flame.

The first one went closer and said “I know about love.”

The second one touched the flame lightly with his wings and said “I know how love’s fire can burn.”

The third one threw himself into the heart of the flame and was consumed.

He alone knows what true love is.

Bab ‘Aziz the film, supposedly with its origins in the poetry of Rumi.